Courses
Explore the exciting array of courses offered as part of your degree at Redeemer.
An introduction to the theological reading and interpretative practices of reading Scripture. This course involves a survey of biblical interpretation and the variety of methodologies that have been used to study Scripture.
This course establishes the basic framework of core knowledge concerning the nature of human interaction. It will survey theories and research in communication as it is applied to various social, political, and cultural contexts. Students will develop a broad Christian framework for understanding, critiquing, and utilizing these theories.
Prerequisites:
Introduction to Media and Communications
MCS‑121
This course introduces students to the rise of mass media and communication and its impact and influence on modern society. Basic media forms and their function in society will be surveyed and students will develop a Christian perspective on media and its role in both the production and consumption of culture. Students will examine the application of a Reformed Christian worldview to understanding communication and communication-related vocations. The relationship between Christianity and professional communication, including professions in the media, will be discussed.
Introduction to Media and Communications (MCS‑121)
This course offers exposure to theories and methods of therapeutic counselling. Basic training in therapeutic communication and counselling techniques are also included.
Prerequisites: Year 4 standing in an honours or general psychology major or permission of the instructor
Related programs: Psychology
This seminar provides an in-depth examination of topics in experimental psychology with an advanced research component. Students will learn about, and evaluate, theoretical approaches used to direct research in the topic area and will need to critically examine recent empirical articles in the topic area.
Prerequisites: Year 4 standing in an honours or general psychology major or permission of the instructor
Related programs: Psychology
This seminar examines select issues in depth psychology, particularly classical drive theory (as developed by Sigmund Freud) and analytical psychology (as developed by Carl Jung). Based on student interest, developments in other psychoanalytic traditions, such as ego and self psychology, and object relations theory may receive some attention
Prerequisites: Year 4 standing in an honours or general psychology major or permission of the instructor
Related programs: Psychology
A thematic and comparative course examining the history of the totalitarian political movements of the 20th century and their world- wide impact. The course focuses on four main areas: international fascism and Nazism; communism, both Western and non-Western; totalitarianism’s effects on the non-totalitarian world; and resistance to totalitarianism. Throughout the course, attention will be given to the religious nature of totalitarian systems and their historical conflict with other religious commitments, especially those of Christianity.
Prerequisites: HUM-120 or HIS-108
A thematic and comparative course examining the history of the totalitarian political movements of the 20th century and their world- wide impact. The course focuses on four main areas: international fascism and Nazism; communism, both Western and non-Western; totalitarianism’s effects on the non-totalitarian world; and resistance to totalitarianism. Throughout the course, attention will be given to the religious nature of totalitarian systems and their historical conflict with other religious commitments, especially those of Christianity.
Prerequisites: HUM-120 or HIS-108
Toxicology ENV‑432 (BIO‑445)
Toxicology is the field of study which seeks to understand the adverse effects of toxic substances (chemical, physical, and/or biological) to living organisms. Fundamental concepts will be addressed such as dose-response relationships, mechanism of uptake, transport, distribution and storage of xenobiotics, detoxification and depuration, target organ toxicity and physiological consequences (e.g. teratogenesis, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis), and risk assessment techniques. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Toxicology BIO‑445
Toxicology is the field of study which seeks to understand the adverse effects of toxic substances (chemical, physical, and/or biological) to living organisms. Fundamental concepts will be addressed such as dose-response relationships, mechanism of uptake, transport, distribution and storage of xenobiotics, detoxification and depuration, target organ toxicity and physiological consequences (e.g. teratogenesis, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis), and risk assessment techniques. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Prerequisites:
Fundamentals of Biology II
BIO‑122
This course explores the broad branches of the tree of life and how organisms interact with each other and with the environment. The structure and function of representative species of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals are examined in lecture and laboratory. Phylogeny and the theory of evolution are covered and discussed within a Christian framework. Includes a bi-weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Fundamentals of Biology II (BIO‑122);
Principles of Chemistry II
CHE‑122
A continuation of CHE-121. Topics include reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, strong and weak acids and bases, solubility products, electrochemistry, the direction of chemical change, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Includes a bi-weekly three hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Principles of Chemistry II (CHE‑122); BIO-242 or 261
Related programs: Biochemistry; Biology
This course traces the rise of England from the periphery of power in Europe at the outset of the sixteenth century during the reign of the first Tudor monarch, Henry VII, to a position of increasing might and opulence after the Glorious Revolution of 1688–89 and the death of the final Stuart monarch, Queen Anne in 1714. Students will spend time considering the political, social, cultural, and religious transformations of England during this period, and seek to understand when, how, and why England became a modern nation-state.
Prerequisites:
Western Culture & Tradition II
HUM‑120
This course traces the development of Western culture from 1500 to the present through history, philosophy, literature, science, and the fine arts.
Western Culture & Tradition II (HUM‑120)
Early Modern Europe: 1450-1789
HIS‑241
An examination of the social, political, and intellectual history of Europe from the late Middle Ages to the revolutionary era. Topics will include the origin and nature of the Reformation, the wars of religion, European overseas expansion, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution as the course explores the development of European states in the larger world.
Early Modern Europe: 1450-1789 (HIS‑241); HIS-241 recommended
Related programs: History
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