ART 210: 3D Design

An introduction to three-dimensional design: process, planning and production.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Manipulate, integrate and engineer materials to build three-dimensional objects.
  2. Identify and analyze the elements, principles and vocabulary of three-dimensional design.
  3. Utilize and integrate the elements, principles, materials and processes of three-dimensional design.
  4. Articulate knowledge of various modes of contemporary sculpture and the history of sculpture.
  5. Advance abilities to analyze and discuss one’s own and others’ work in group critique.

ART 212: Figure Drawing

An introduction to both analytical and expressive methods of drawing the human figure. Students will study the human figure (and animals) using traditional and contemporary tools and resources, including models.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Refine concepts introduced in Introduction to Drawing utilizing the figure as the primary subject.
  2. Develop further expertise in drawing media and materials.
  3. Learn to draw a human figure in space with correct general proportions.
  4. Employ the figure compositionally to visually express ideas or narrative.
  5. Draw the human figure in line and/or tone using a variety of drawing media.
  6. Investigate through drawing, the interaction of structure, anatomy, design and expression, as it relates to the figure.
  7. Explore the relationship of the figure to its pictorial space, both abstract and naturalistic.
  8. Evaluate historical & contemporary approaches to the figurative process
  9. Advance abilities to analyze and discuss one’s own and others’ work in group critique.
  10. Develop consistent studio work habits by producing multiple weekly short term and as well as larger, long-term paintings.
  11. The student will continue to demonstrate insightful observation skills of subject matter in his/her work, and use a variety of drawing media.
  12. Demonstrate a developing artistic point of view and an ability to produce a cohesive body of work both stylistically and conceptually.

ART 215: Intermediate Painting

As an extension of ART-115, this course will focus on problems in painting at the intermediate level, with emphasis on exploration of the nuances of the painting language.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Refine concepts introduced in Introduction to Painting to explore the possibilities of realism, representation and abstraction through conceptual and formal painting investigations
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the varied technical aspects of building a painting surface competently and the use of various painting mediums and painting techniques
  3. Understand the composition of acrylic and oil pigments and mediums
  4. Execute proper support preparation including stretching and priming canvas and panel construction.
  5. Refine an awareness the major movements in painting that are the foundation of contemporary painting.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of form and content working together in creating a painting.
  7. Advance abilities to analyze and discuss one’s own and others’ work in group critique.
  8. Develop consistent studio work habits by producing multiple weekly short term and as well as larger, long term paintings.
  9. Practice diverse research methods and source development for new work, discerning how these processes influence the resulting artwork.
  10. Demonstrate a developing artistic point of view and an ability to produce a cohesive body of work both stylistically and conceptually.
  11. Continue to use and apply art concepts to create works of art that use organizational principles to solve specific visual problems.
  12. Continue to demonstrate insightful observation skills of subject matter in his/her work, and use a variety of media.

ART 218: Illustrative Design

Study and practice of illustration in design including, a brief history, industry production process, copyright, marketing, diversity of styles and market sectors. Using industry standard original media students will solve illustrative problems in key market applications.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Show ability to effectively conceptualize and express an idea, and/or text in a visual image.
  2. Apply the creative process, including sketching, photo-referencing, researching and planning, towards the creation of effective illustrations.
  3. Demonstrate skills using a variety of media such as pencil, pen, paint, collage and computer in the creation of diverse illustrative works.
  4. Demonstrate basic studio skills including, measuring, centering, cutting, mounting and matting for the presentation of finished illustrations.
  5. identify major illustration styles and key developments in the history of illustration, industry design and production.
  6. Describe and critique illustrations, and articulate visual concepts
  7. Experiment with various illustration media and techniques.
  8. Write thoughtfully about illustration as a form of visual communication..

ART 225: Art History I : Ancient to Medieval

This course will survey the arts of Egypt, the Near East, the Classical Greek and Roman worlds, and Medieval Europe, from about 3500 BC to about 1400 AD. We will consider the great variety and richness of the arts of these different cultures, and some of the general problems of how art historians understand and write about art. We will discuss problems of the social context of art: its historical circumstances, context, patronage, the influence of the individual artist, and the role of those who have been the viewers of art. We will consider what constitutes understanding and explanation in art history, and some of the different ways we can approach a work of art and grasp its various meanings.

We will spend about half the course on the ancient world, Greece and Rome, and half on late antiquity and the medieval period; and will look at works of sculpture, architecture, wall and vase painting, mosaic, manuscript illumination, and other media, and try to consider all these works in their physical, historical and social contexts.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify major works, artists, schools, styles, and historical events and figures from Prehistory to Late Gothic.
  2. Identify individual art works, architectural monuments by title, medium, location of origin, and period of production.
  3. Build and use correct terminology, specific to pre-Renaissance visual art production in Ancient/Classical Cultures and Mediaeval Europe.
  4. Understand the parts of a building and the accurate way to describe an elevation and a plan for Classical and Medieval architecture.
  5. Comprehend the advancements of technology as it impacts art.
  6. Build understanding of historical, political, religious and cultural contexts for the production of works of art from Prehistory to the 14th Century.
  7. Be sensitively attuned to the diversity of ways in which biblical texts and Christian beliefs and practices have informed and inspired artistic responses throughout history.
  8. Compare and contrast works of art in order to sharpen analytical and critical thinking skills in examining visual media.
  9. Improve writing and speaking skills through group work and informal presentation of images.
  10. Analyze relationships between formal elements (style, medium), and thematic or ideological context of works.
  11. Experience the impact of seeing course specific art in person within a museum of civilization setting.

ART 226: Art History II: Renaissance to Contemporary

This course will survey Western art from approximately 1400 AD to contemporary postmodern art. We will discuss problems of the social context of art: its historical circumstances, context, patronage, the influence of the individual artist, and the role of those who have been the viewers of art. We will pay particular attention to the rise of the artist as genius, the concept of “beauty” and its attachment to art, and the fetishization of the “Art” object. We will consider what constitutes understanding and explanation in art history, and some of the different ways we can approach a work of art and grasp its various meanings.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify major works, artists, schools, styles, and historical events and figures from Renaissance to the present.
  2. Identify individual art works and architectural monuments by artist’s name, title, medium, location of origin, and period of production.
  3. Build and use correct terminology, specific to post-Renaissance visual art production
  4. Comprehend the advancements of technology as it impacts art.
  5. Build understanding of historical, political, religious and cultural contexts for the production of works of art from 15th Century to present.
  6. Be sensitively attuned to the diversity of ways in which biblical texts and Christian beliefs and practices have informed and inspired artistic responses throughout history.
  7. Compare and contrast works of art in order to sharpen analytical and critical thinking skills in examining visual media.
  8. Analyze relationships between formal elements (style, medium), and thematic or ideological context of works.
  9. Improve writing and speaking skills through group work and informal presentation of images.
  10. Experience the impact of seeing course specific art in person within a gallery setting.