Undergraduate Degree Level Expectations

As a Christian undergraduate university, Redeemer University College is committed to university-level education that is well rooted in the Christian faith. The university has developed a set of undergraduate degree level expectations that should be realized by a successful student upon completion of a bachelor’s degree or honours bachelor’s degree. They were approved by Senate in January 2008.

Bachelor’s Degree

 Honours Bachelor’s Degree

This degree is awarded to students who have demonstrated:I. Depth and Breadth of KnowledgeA. An understanding of one or more academic disciplines set in a knowledge of the contours of Western culture, with a beginning introduction to some elements of other cultures, through the study of a broad liberal arts and science curriculum;

B. An understanding of how the subject material in the disciplines in which they have majored has been shaped by historical forces, philosophical ideas and systems, and of religious commitments and worldviews that have shaped Western culture;

C. A familiarity with a long tradition of Christian inquiry into the nature of human life with special attention to writers in the Reformed tradition from the sixteenth century to the present. Students are expected to show how their own analyses and creative productions stand in that tradition, in appreciative and critical ways;

D. A general knowledge of many key concepts, methodologies, theoretical approaches, and assumptions in a discipline;

E. A broad understanding of some of the major fields in a discipline, including, where appropriate, from an interdisciplinary perspective;

F. Some detailed knowledge in an area of the discipline and the ability to do research or creative work in a field as evidence of understanding its chief contours;

G. An ability to gather, review, evaluate, and interpret information relevant to one or more of the major fields of a discipline; and

H. Some creative and imaginative approaches showing critical thinking, analytical and technical skills inside and outside the discipline.

II. Knowledge of Methodologies

An understanding of methods of inquiry or creative activity, or both, in their primary area of study that enables students to:

A. Begin to discern what are the philosophical and worldview assumptions imbedded in the paradigms and conceptual frameworks commonly relied on in their areas of study;

B. Begin to judge what are the valid insights in such paradigms and concepts and evaluate how they can be used with integrity within a Christian frame of reference; and

C. Develop arguments, solve problems or create artistic works using such methods.


III. Application of Knowledge

A. The ability to review, present, and interpret information, different types of evidence, or creative work to:
1. Develop lines of argument;

2. Make sound judgements that respect the data being studied and employ appropriate and responsible paradigms;

B. The ability to use a basic range of appropriate techniques to:

1. Analyze information;

2. Evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems related to their area(s) of study;

3. Propose solutions; and

C. The ability to make use of scholarly reviews and primary sources with a beginning sense of critical judgement of the value of the sources.

IV. Communication Skills

The ability to communicate accurately, reliably and winsomely and with conviction — orally and in writing — to a range of audiences.

V. Awareness of Limits of Knowledge

An awareness of the limits of their own knowledge, and that of other humans, knowing that we see now as “through a glass darkly,” balanced by a recognition of patterns of constant standards rooted in the created order that have always reassured men and women that truth, right and wrong can be discerned.

They are expected to have some awareness of postmodern theories concerning the contingency of knowledge, in the context of both the reliability of the created order, which allows one to know, and the biblical hope that the end of men and women is finally to see fully and truly in the light of God.

VI. Maturity and Professional Capacity

A. Qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, and community involvement in church and society, requiring:

1. The exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making in the context of membership in Christ’s Church and as part of God’s world;

2. Working effectively with others;

B. The ability to identify and address their own changing needs in a changing world and to select, in community, an appropriate program of further study; and

C. Behaviour consistent with academic integrity and the ethic of educated Christians, committed to using their learning in service to neighbour and to the glory of God.

This degree is awarded to students who have demonstrated:I. Depth and Breadth of Knowledge A. A developed understanding of one or more academic disciplines set in a deep knowledge of the history and ethos of Western culture, with knowledge of other cultures, through the study of a broad liberal arts and science curriculum;

B. A developed understanding of how the subject matter in the disciplines in which they have majored has been shaped by historical forces, philosophical ideas and systems, and of religious commitments and worldviews that have shaped Western culture;

C. A strong knowledge of a long tradition of Christian inquiry into the nature of human life with special attention to writers in the Reformed tradition from the sixteenth century to the present. Students are expected to articulate with some depth how their own analyses and creative productions stand in that tradition, in appreciative and critical ways;

D. A developed knowledge and critical understanding of the key concepts, recent developments, methodologies, theoretical approaches, and assumptions in a discipline generally, as well as in a specialized area of a discipline;

E. A developed understanding of many of the major fields in a discipline, including, where appropriate, from an interdisciplinary perspective;

F. A developed, detailed knowledge of a field and a level of research, writing, or creative work that suggests readiness to pursue that field beyond the undergraduate level;

G. A developed ability to gather, review, evaluate, and interpret information, and to compare the merits of alternative hypotheses or creative options, relevant to one or more of the major fields in a discipline; and

H. Significant creative and imaginative approaches showing critical thinking, analytical and technical skills inside and outside the discipline.

II. Knowledge of Methodologies

An understanding of methods of inquiry or creative activity, or both, in their primary area of study that enables students to:

A. Discern what are the philosophical and worldview assumptions imbedded in the paradigms and conceptual frameworks commonly relied on in their areas of study and be able to articulate how theories and methodologies are shaped by a worldview;

B. Judge what are the valid insights in such paradigms and concepts and evaluate how they can be used with integrity within a Christian frame of reference; and

C. In a developed way, formulate arguments, solve problems, or create artistic works using such methods, and describe and analyze current research or advanced scholarship.

III. Application of Knowledge

A. The ability to review, present, and interpret information, different types of evidence, or creative work to:

1. Develop lines of argument;

2. Make sound judgements that respect the data being studied and employ appropriate and responsible paradigms;

3. Refine underlying concepts, principles, and techniques of analysis, adapting them to fit the data, and to be faithful to a non-reductionistic worldview for use in and outside the discipline;

4. Where possible, use such revised paradigms or techniques to forge new understandings in the creative process;

B. The ability to use a range of appropriate techniques to:

1. Initiate and undertake critical evaluation of arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts, and information;

2. Propose solutions;

3. Frame appropriate questions for the purpose of solving a problem;

4. Solve a problem or create new work and a new understanding; and

C. Dexterity in making critical use of scholarly reviews and primary sources.

IV. Communication Skills

The ability to communicate information, arguments, and analyses accurately and reliably, winsomely and with conviction — orally and in writing — to a range of audiences.

V. Awareness of Limits of Knowledge

An awareness of the limits of their own knowledge, and that of other humans, knowing that we see now as “through a glass darkly,” balanced by a recognition of patterns of constant standards rooted in the created order that have always reassured men and women that truth, right, and wrong can be discerned.

They are expected to know postmodern theories concerning the contingency of knowledge, in the context of both the reliability of the created order, which allows one to know, and the biblical hope that the end of men and women is finally to see fully and truly in the light of God.


VI. Maturity and Professional Capacity

A. Qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, and community involvement in church and society, requiring:

1. The exercise of initiative, personal responsibility, and accountability in the context of membership in Christ’s Church and as part of God’s world;

2. Working effectively with others;

3. Decision-making and leadership in complex contexts;

B. The ability to identify and address their own changing needs in a changing world and to select, in community, an appropriate program of further study; and

C. Behaviour consistent with academic integrity and the ethic of educated Christians, committed to using their learning and leadership in service to neighbour and to the glory of God.