Courses

Honours Major: Biology (16 courses)

Cognate Requirements:

General Major: Biology (11 courses)

Cognate Requirements:

Minor: Biology (6 courses)

Please note: Students have the option of taking 300 and 400-level courses through the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the department. For more information, visit ausable.org.

Course Details

BIO-121
Fundamentals of Biology I

A course designed as an introduction to the discipline for biology majors and minors. This course examines biology ranging from the diversity of life and ecology down to the level of the cell. The structure and function of representative species of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals are examined in both the lecture and the laboratory, and Christian perspectives on evolutionary theory are discussed. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
Grade 12 U Biology and Chemistry or permission of the department
Corequisites:
CHE-121

BIO-122
Fundamentals of Biology II

Emphasis is placed on the molecular and cellular processes in living organisms, and how these processes are involved in the physiology of representative plants and animals. Topics examined in the lecture and laboratory include biological molecules, metabolism, genetics, biotechnology, and the structure and function of plants and animals. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-121
or permission of the instructor
Corequisites:
CHE-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-223
Survey of the Plant Kingdom

An introduction to the major groups of living plants, with emphasis on classification. Aspects of classification include methods and principles, comparative biochemistry, structure and function, growth, development, and reproduction. The role of certain plants as a source of fundamental biological knowledge is emphasized. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-224
Invertebrate Zoology

An introduction to the major groups of living and fossil animals with emphasis on classification. Aspects of classification include methods and principles, comparative biochemistry, structure, function, growth, development, and reproduction. The importance of certain animals in fundamental biological research is emphasized. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122

BIO-226
Medicinal Botany

An introduction to the medicinal properties of plants. This course explores the historic and present day use of plants and plant substances to treat disease. Emphasis will be placed on the therapeutic use of plants in the treatment of disorders involving the musculoskeletal system, nervous system, heart and circulatory system, gastrointestinal system, respiratory system and urogenital system. Plant botanicals used in the prevention and treatment of cancer, skin and oral disorders may also be examined.

Offered infrequently

Prerequisites:
BIO-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-232
Ecology and Evolution

An introduction to organismal and physiological ecology (the interactions of organisms with their physical environment), population and community biology, and the structure and function of ecosystems. Includes a weekly three-hour lab or field work. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-242
Cell and Molecular Biology

A study of the structure and function of cells as the fundamental building units of living organisms. Topics include cell growth and metabolism, the molecular constituents of cells, major cell organelles, and special cell functions. Methods of investigation will be examined throughout the course and the development of hypotheses and theories will be placed in a historical and contemporary context. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-248
Forensic Biology

A course designed to explore the biological techniques used in forensic biology. Topics may include forensic serology, forensic entomology, DNA analysis, environmental issues relating to decomposition, decay rates, the collection of specimens, and the analysis of biological and physical samples. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Offered infrequently

Prerequisites:
BIO-122
or permission of the instructor

BIO-261
Genetics

Discussion of the organization, replication, transmission, expression, and evolution of genetic materials. The course is organized around the levels of genes, chromosomes, organisms and populations. Topics include the expression, control and mutation of genes; the molecular organization and information coding; replication, repair, transmission and mutation of chromosomes; the relation between genes, genotype, phenotype and environment; and the genetic structure and variability of populations, including selection and speciation. Throughout the course methods of investigation will be explained. The structure and operation of genetics as a science will also receive attention. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122

BIO-325
Vertebrate Zoology

An introduction to the taxonomic groups of vertebrate organisms and their defining features. Topics include comparative morphology, reproduction, development, environmental adaptation, and development of vertebrate organ systems. Includes a weekly three-hour lab or field trips. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122

BIO-333
Field Biology

A course designed to increase the exposure of students to organisms in their field settings. Topics discussed include biogeography, the observation of the integration of structural and functional diversity in local ecosystems, techniques in taxonomy, population sampling, and hypothesis testing in the field. Some field work will be scheduled for Saturdays. Includes a weekly three-hour lab or field work. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-232
or permission of the instructor

BIO-335
Perspectives on Evolution

An examination of the history and philosophy of science as it relates to the development of the evolutionary world view from Aristotle through the 18th century to the modern era. Topics include the Modern Synthesis theory of evolution, the physiological and psychological relatedness of humans and animals, the scientific evidence for and against evolution, and evolution as the foundations for scientific thought. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
Year 3 or 4 standingBIO-334 is the Capstone Course in the Biology Department and is required for all majors in the 3rd or 4th year.

BIO-336
Physiological Psychology

This course will examine some of the global issues in psychology that touch on the relationship between neurological mechanisms and human personhood. Students will study introductory neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, concentrating on neural and synaptic transmission and basic subdivisions of the nervous system. Building on this foundation, various topics will be discussed including lateralization of functions, sensory systems, motivation and regulatory systems, emotional behaviour, learning and memory, and brain damage and related disorders.

Prerequisites:
PSY-121 or PSY-122

BIO-343
Plant Physiology

An examination of physiological mechanisms of plant growth and development. Topics include water relations, the movement of water and solutes, photosynthesis, nutrition, the production of plant substances, plant hormones, photomorphogenesis, and periodism. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122

BIO-351
Microbiology

An introductory course which provides an understanding of microbial structure and biochemistry and includes practical experience in the handling and maintenance of microbial cultures. Topics include the classification and identification of micro-organisms, the role of microorganisms in health and disease, and the application of microbial processes in industry. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-242
or permission of the instructor

BIO-361
Biochemistry I: Structures and Functions of Biomolecules

Formerly CHE-365. An introduction to the structure, function and analysis of the major classes of biomolecules found in living organisms: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Includes an introduction to the structure and function of enzymes. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
CHE-221
BIO-242, CHE-222

BIO-363
Developmental Biology

A study of irreversible biological phenomena at the molecular, cellular and organismal level. Topics include oogenesis, spermatogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, morphogenesis, cell interactions, induction, cell differentiation, pattern formation, and sex determination. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-231 or 252

BIO-381
Senior Seminar I

These courses consist of a weekly one-hour seminar that explores the contexts for the disciplines of biology, including historical, theological, ethical, societal, and vocational dimensions. The seminars will also equip students to arry out scientific research in the fields of biology (0.75 credits each)

Prerequisites:
Year 3 or 4 standing in a Biology honours major

BIO-382
Senior Seminar II

These courses consist of a weekly one-hour seminar that explores the contexts for the disciplines of biology, including historical, theological, ethical, societal, and vocational dimensions. The seminars will also equip students to carry out scientific research in the fields of biology (0.75 credits each)

Prerequisites:
Year 3 or 4 standing in a Biology honours major

BIO-383
Senior Seminar III

These courses consist of a weekly one-hour seminar that explores the contexts for the disciplines of biology, including historical, theological, ethical, societal, and vocational dimensions. The seminars will also equip students to carry out scientific research in the fields of biology (0.75 credits each)

Prerequisites:
Year 3 or 4 standing in a Biology honours major

BIO-384
Senior Seminar IV

These courses consist of a weekly one-hour seminar that explores the contexts for the disciplines of biology, including historical, theological, ethical, societal, and vocational dimensions. The seminars will also equip students to carry out scientific research in the fields of biology (0.75 credits each)

Prerequisites:
Year 3 or 4 standing in a Biology honours major

BIO-426
Comparative Animal Physiology

This course examines different physiological processes seen in the animal kingdom that allow organisms to maintain homeostasis while inhabiting diverse climates and dynamic environments. Topics include aquatic and aerial respiration, cardiovascular systems, water and solute balance, excretion, cellular energetics, membrane physiology, nervous systems, cell movement, and endocrinology. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-224 or 325

BIO-441
Neurobiology

This course provides a detailed exploration of the basic physiological processes that occur within the nervous systems of various organisms. Emphasis is placed on the invertebrate nervous systems and the manner by which simple systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the mammalian brain. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:


BIO-445
Toxicology

Toxicology is the field of study which seeks to understand the adverse effects of toxic substances (chemical, physical, and/or biological) to living organisms. Fundamental concepts will be addressed such as dose-response relationships, mechanism of uptake, transport, distribution and storage of xenobiotics, detoxification and depuration, target organ toxicity and physiological consequences (e.g. teratogenesis, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis), and risk assessment techniques. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-122, CHE-122

Recommended: BIO-242, CHE-231

BIO-462
Biochemistry II: Enzymes and Metabolism

Formerly CHE-366. An investigation of the kinetics and regulation of enzyme catalyzed reactions, the principles of metabolism, and the central metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the citric acid cycle, the electronic transport chain, fatty acid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-361

BIO-463
Advanced Techniques in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

This course will provide students with an immersion into the world of molecular biology research. Students will investigate unique research questions within a team-based laboratory setting. Throughout the course, students will gain experience with project and experimental design, various laboratory techniques, data analysis and interpretation, as well as the honing of oral and written communication skills. This course is particularly intended for students interested in graduate studies, or careers in the research field. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. 

Prerequisites:
BIO-261, BIO-361, BIO-351

Recommended: HSC-342

BIO-467
Endocrinology

This course provides basic knowledge of the structure and function of the endocrine system in a variety of organisms ranging from vertebrates to man. The role of endocrine glands in growth and the reproduction and maintenance of homeostasis are described as well as the neurological pathways coordinating the timing of hormone release. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies. (Offered infrequently)

Prerequisites:


BIO-480
Internship

A one-term training experience in a specific area of biology. The purpose of the internship is to give students on-the-job experience and to help students in making career decisions and in preparing students for post-graduate education and for employment opportunities. See page 52 of the Academic Calendar for information on internships.

Prerequisites:
Year 4 standing

BIO-485
Honours Independent Study

Available in areas such as developmental biology, genetics, ecology, invertebrate physiology, zoology, and toxicology. For information on setting up an independent study see page 52 of the Academic Calendar.


BIO-490
Honours Research Project

This course is typically a one-term undergraduate student research project. Students will plan, carry out, analyze, interpret, and present the results of a departmentally-approved research project. The course is especially intended for students interested in applying to graduate school. For more information on setting up an independent research project, see page 52 of the Academic Calendar.


Are You Ready for the Next Step?

You Might Also Like

Biochemistry

  • Bachelor of Science
  • Honours Major

Health Sciences – Pre-Medicine

  • Bachelor of Science
  • Honours Major
/Connect With Redeemer