Taking Care of Church Business
A business student recently discovered how her business education can help her serve churches.
5 min. read
November 7, 2023

When people think of church, they rarely think of business. If they do, it is often with the negative connotation that a church might be profiting in an unethical way instead of properly serving people. Even Sarina Tabet, a business honours major studying administration and management, did not fully realize how integrated business is with church, nor did she expect to complete her co-op at one.

That is until she reached out to an old connection at Hope Bible Church in Oakville, and asked if she could put her in contact with anyone regarding a co-op opportunity. However, instead of having her name passed along, Tabet was offered the opportunity to complete her co-op at Hope.

Tabet admits that she was “at first a bit hesitant” because she was attending a different church and knew that typically it was expected that you worship where you work. But Natasha—her supervisor—clarified that she wanted Tabet to stay involved with her current church if she took the co-op, stressing the importance of staying connected with community.

“I was beyond thankful for the opportunity to work at one church and be involved in another. I believe that was only possible because God opened the door.”

After accepting the offer, Tabet began her role as the events and special projects co-op student at Hope. She planned and oversaw conferences, retreats, camps, a wedding and a funeral, preparing event reports and budgets and being a liaison between clients and attendees.

I was beyond thankful for the opportunity to work at one church and be involved in another. I believe that was only possible because God opened the door.

These tasks showed Tabet that there is a lot of business involved in event planning and church organizations.

Though Tabet acknowledges that “events are more on the business side of church rather than the ministry side,” she compares different aspects of ministry within the church to the “client” in the business model. Knowing that the church’s priority must be to have “Christ at the centre of and above everything else,” she demonstrated the integral role she had in ensuring her work was done in line with and for her faith.

Tabet says the biggest lesson her co-op taught her was how her faith impacts event planning.

“Walking into the co-op, I wasn’t sure how the two related. I learned quickly that any work I do should reflect my faith.”

Her time at Hope confirmed the knowledge that she must have this mindset as she goes through life in whatever she does.

“I may not always be planning events for a church, but wherever I work I can show clients, coworkers, and maybe one day employees, the love of Christ by how I interact with them.” Her supervisor played a big role in setting this standard.

The church always needs business-minded people to serve as accountants to help with finance or marketers to help promote events, and so much more. Working at Hope showed me that business and church can relate.

“During our first meeting the first question she asked me was how she could pray for me. She was also always available and willing to answer questions and offer advice. I am extremely grateful for her, and I hope I can be half as good a supervisor as she has been one day.”

Though her co-op opportunity certainly opened a new door to her, Tabet knows her time at Redeemer put her in a position to excel in her event planning role. From preparing creative briefs in her marketing communications class, to budgets that dealt with revenue and expenses or just expenses in accounting classes, Tabet knows her learning was crucial to her success.

Now that she has completed her co-op, Tabet is grateful for what was an unexpected experience, and encourages other business majors to consider finding opportunities in churches.

“The church always needs business-minded people to serve as accountants to help with finance or marketers to help promote events, and so much more. Working at Hope showed me that business and church can relate.”

But beyond the potential for career paths and opportunities, Tabet strongly believes that utilizing a business degree and knowledge in church gives you a front seat not only to see the church at work but to be a part something positive and larger than yourself.

“It’s an opportunity you shouldn’t miss or take for granted.”

You might also like

Compared to public universities in southern Ontario, Redeemer University delivers a unique, cost-competitive education.
The Innovation Centre empowers students to think, try, and launch their own entrepreneurial ideas, offering a makerspace, mentoring, hands-on learning opportunities and events.
Dr. Sophia Kusyk, a strategic leader, teacher, scholar and champion of redemptive business practice, will lead Redeemer University’s School of Business into its next chapter.

Resound is Redeemer University’s online, multi-faceted publishing hub for the wide variety of stories coming out of Redeemer year-round. It is also offered in a print edition.