B.Ed.

Education Program

Students of the B.Ed program at Redeemer become a part of a vibrant, collaborative cohort of fellow students on campus and also get to take part in four unique and challenging practicum placement experiences. Our graduates have an outstanding record of securing employment in education nationally and internationally.

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Program

Timeline

If you're looking to become a teacher but need to complete your first degree, review Redeemer's offerings of undergraduate programs.
Semester 1
Two mornings per week in observational practicum placement, rest of time dedicated to studies at Redeemer.
Semester 2
Six weeks of studies at Redeemer, followed by six weeks of full time practicum placement.
Semester 1
Six weeks of studies at Redeemer, followed by six weeks of full time practicum placement.
Semester 2
Six weeks of studies at Redeemer, followed by six weeks of full time practicum placement.
View Course List

The B.Ed. program has been designed to include 110 days of practical teaching experience. Placements begin in the first semester with candidates working with students for up to 20 days in connection with their Educational Psychology course. The remaining three semesters, candidates participate in focused course work for the first six weeks, followed by six weeks of practicum placement. Practicum placements provide the vital theory/practice link as candidates reflect on what they have learned in their courses and apply these learnings in the classroom.

Practicum Placements are arranged by the School of Education to meet certification requirements for the specific streams. We work with a variety of partner boards and schools including public, Catholic and independent schools.

Additional Certification

Successful graduates may also qualify for the Christian Schools Teachers Certificate. For more information on gaining this certification, visit the Vocate website or contact your admissions counselor.

Additional Certification

Education Faculty

We believe that character development happens in the classroom as much as outside of it. Our faculty teach, mentor and disciple students through learning.

Prof. Trevor Brown

Adjunct Lecturer in Education
M.A. (1981) Mathematics, York University, Toronto, ON.;...More

Prof. Jordan Burgsma

Adjunct Lecturer in Education
M.Ed. (2019), Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.;...More

Prof. Justin Cook

Adjunct Lecturer in Education
M.A (Cand.) Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto, ON.;...More

Dr. Lisa Devall-Martin

Assistant Professor of Education
Ph.D. (2017), Entrepreneurial Leadership in Education;...More

Dr. Terry Loerts

Associate Professor, School of Education, Practicum Supervisor
Ph.D. (2014), Curriculum Studies with a focus on literacy....More

Dr. Sean Schat

Assistant Professor of Education
Ph. D. (2019). Cognition and Learning, Brock University,...More

Dr. Phil Teeuwsen

Dean, School of Education, Associate Professor, School of Education
Ph.D. (2016), Educational Studies, Brock University, St....More

Prof. Pauline VanderVelde

Adjunct Lecturer in Education
ETFO- AQ ESL (2013) Level I & II Secondary, English as...More

Petra Zantingh

Adjunct Lecturer in Art
MA (2014) Fine Art Education, Concordia UniversityThesis:...More
  • Programs:
  • Art

Program

FAQ

Get answers to your top questions about the Education program.
How long will it take me to complete this program?

The program runs from September to April for two years full time. There is not an option to study part time.

Can I do distanced learning?

Students need to be local or able to easily commute while enrolled in the program.

How do I get to my practicum placements?

Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to and from all placements.

How can I get certified to teach grades 11 & 12?

Many graduates of Redeemer’s Junior/Intermediate division program take Additional Basic Qualification (ABQ) courses after graduation to gain a senior designation to teach grades 11 & 12.  It is important to note that a senior designation requires a second teaching subject, with a minimum of 10 courses.  Feel free to connect with your admissions counsellor about this if you have more questions.

I don’t have an undergraduate degree. Can I apply for this program?

In order to be eligible to apply for the Bachelor of Education second degree program at Redeemer, applicants must hold an undergraduate degree first. You can review Redeemer's offering of undergraduate programs as your first step towards becoming a teacher. Students apply for the B.Ed program in their final year of undergraduate studies.

Redeemer's Education program is firmly rooted in a Reformed Christian approach to education. Redeemer believes that this foundation not only equips our graduates to be excellent teachers but also develops a strong philosophy of education that reflects the awe and wonder of Creation, the brokenness and misdirection of a fallen world and the amazing hope of restoration and transformation through Christ.

Program

Courses

EDU-222 — Teaching Music (JI)

This course provides teacher candidates who have identified music as their intermediate division teaching subject with a sustained focus on music curriculum and pedagogy. Building on the foundation established in EDU-333, this course will provide depth and breadth for the effective teaching of music in the intermediate grades. (1.5 credits)

EDU-251 — An Introduction to Children’s Literature (PJI)

A survey of standards, classic and contemporary books for children, with special consideration of literature’s capacity to delight, to instruct and shape the values and convictions of young readers.

EDU-301 — Development and Learning

The purpose of this course is to extend the knowledge of psychology as it applies to teaching and learning, while introducing students to theories and techniques of pedagogy. The teacher assisting experience (see EDU-303) seeks to provide a bridge between theory and practice and to serve as part of an apprenticeship experience.

Corequisites
EDU-301 and 303 are delivered as a package, where learning from the courses
are entwined with 100 hours of classroom observation and assistance in schools,
leading to the exploration and application of learning concepts.
EDU-303 — Social Foundations and Introduction to Teaching

In this course, students participate as teacher assistants in local elementary schools for an equivalent of two full mornings a week (100 hours minimum spread over the term). In addition to assisting a teacher in various classroom duties, the practicum demands intensive observation, active teaching, and thoughtful reflection. This practicum is required and integral to the course of study for EDU-301/303.

EDU-306 — History and Philosophy of Education

This course reviews the history and philosophy of education. It seeks to help students understand how worldview and philosophy come to expression in schools. Its review of schooling and educational philosophy is focused on helping one understand present educational patterns in Canada and develop one’s own philosophy of education. A Western tradition is not the only important tradition in Canada today and discussions will seek to relate the history and philosophy studied to concerns for equity, multiculturalism, and equal opportunity.

Prerequisites
EDU-306 serves as the Capstone Course for the B.Ed. degree
EDU-307 — Teaching Religion Studies (PJI)

This is a basic course in the purpose, curriculum and methods of dealing with religious studies in schools. It will include a study of the Ontario curriculum and guidelines for religious education in public schools, separate schools, and independent schools. It will stress the importance of respecting beliefs of all children and their families. It is strongly recommended that those who plan to take a 400-level field experience in an independent Christian school take this course in advance of their placement. (1.5 credits)

EDU-310 — Religious Education in Catholic Schools (PJI)

This course is designed to prepare candidates to teach in Catholic schools. It fosters professional knowledge in the field of Religious Education, assists in the acquisition of the theological background and pedagogical skills necessary for the implementation of Religious Education curriculum, develops skills that enhance the integration of Gospel values across the curriculum, and promotes an understanding of teaching as a vocation rooted in the call to Christian ministry. This course is required for those
in the junior/intermediate division who wish to claim Religious Education in Catholic Schools as a teaching subject. It is strongly recommended that those who plan to take a 400-level practicum in a Catholic school take this course in advance of their placement.

EDU-321 — Teaching Visual Art (JI)

This course provides teacher candidates who have identified visual art as their intermediate division teaching subject with a sustained focus on art curriculum and pedagogy. Building on the foundation established in EDU-333, this course will provide depth and breadth for the effective teaching of art in the intermediate grades. (1.5 credits)

EDU-322 — Multiliteracies in Education (PJI)

This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of multiliteracies in P/J/I classrooms across the curriculum. Reflecting today’s social and cultural diversities, multiliteracies practices allow for flexibility in supporting linguistic, cultural, and multimodal forms of communication reflecting the Ontario Literacy curriculum’s expanded understanding of literacy. Understanding how to utilize multimodal forms of communication in classrooms to support collaborative learning, inquiry, and
differentiated learning styles helps support a social community of practice which is foundational to developing a pedagogy of multiliteracies. Teacher candidates will learn about how multiliteracies can inspire creativity, is inclusive for all student abilities, and can be both local and global while supporting the Ontario curriculum. Students will work with a variety of multiliteracies resources, expand their understandings of multiliteracies pedagogy, and develop appropriate assessment practices across grade levels and curricula. Purposeful reflection and integration of a Christian worldview will shape our understandings of how Christ is reflected in all things for his purposes. (1.5 credits).

EDU-323 — Multicultural Education in Global Context (PJI)

This course explores how Canadian schools and teachers intersect with what is currently being termed as diverse “glocal” communities. We explore how educational systems respond to and interact with different multicultural groups within Canada (including immigrants, resident Canadians and global refugees), in multicultural and global educational contexts. The impact of various educational and cultural patterns upon community relations and the formulation of policy for multicultural education will be critiqued. Central to this discussion is an examination of the formation of identity and our response as global citizens to be hospitable and loving to the cultural “others” in our midst from a Christian worldview. This course examines relevant current curriculum documents to best prepare candidates for teaching in an increasingly multicultural and global world. By the end of the course, students will understand different educational systems and how they fit within the framework for the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. (1.5 credits)

EDU-325 — Collaborative Workspaces and Restorative Practices (PJI)

This course provides students with the opportunity to consider the nature and development of a collaborative learning community from a Christian perspective, as well as the potential impacts such a community might have beyond the classroom. It explores cooperative and collaborative learning elements, considering how they could inform and enable community and collaboration in the classroom. Potential
issues and challenges, as well as potential strategies to address them will be identified.
The course also considers the nature and purpose of the use of restorative practices in education. The course will provide students with the opportunity to consider the relationship between their teacher identity, view of learning, and the culture they will seek to establish in their classrooms. (1.5 credits)

EDU-326 — Environmental Education (PJI)

The purpose of this course is to facilitate teacher candidates’ building of theoretical knowledge and pedagogical skills in Environmental Education. Within the course opportunities will be provided for participants to explore fundamental concepts of EE along with various curricular approaches to the subject and how these can inform teachers’ pedagogical practice in classrooms. Specifically, the course
shall interrogate the terms environment, education, care, justice, and action as understood from Christian and other perspectives. Opportunities will be provided for participants to evaluate some of the tensions and practical problems surrounding the implementation of EE in schools. (1.5 credits)

EDU-327 — Indigenous Education (PJI)

This course addresses the histories, cultures, contributions, and perspectives of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples with specific attention paid to education and pedagogy. Candidates will be enabled to recognize their responsibility to engage all learners in their classes to ensure that students of Indigenous background will be able to see their cultures, histories, and perspectives reflected in the curriculum, pedagogy, school and community. This course will help candidates consider the role of schools
in the lives of Indigenous students and the powerful role teachers can play in seeking justice in society. (1.5 credits)

EDU-329 — Teaching French as a Second Language (JI)

This course is intended to enhance professional practice and extend knowledge and skills in the delivery of French as a Second Language. It also explores the theoretical foundations, the development of learners, program planning and implementation, assessment, the learning environment and ethical considerations related to teaching and learning across the divisions. In addition, this course will discuss particular topics
and issues that are relevant to a variety of school systems. NOTE: This course may be considered an equivalent pre-requisite for the FSL Part II AQ course for qualified teachers in the junior/intermediate division with a French teaching subject; however, the course is not equivalent to the FSL Part I AQ course and will not be noted on the Certification of Qualification by the OCT.

Prerequisites
Students wishing to take French as a teaching subject are advised that there
is a GAT: Grammar Accuracy Test and an OPT: Oral Proficiency Test to be passed
(70% minimum) in order to be accepted into EDU-329. These tests should be done
as soon as possible after applying to the program.
EDU-331 — Digital Technology for Learning (PJI)

This course is designed to introduce educators to technology use in a classroom setting. This is a practical, hands-on course in which students will investigate and discover techniques and strategies related to the use of technology in the classroom. Students will find and share resources related to daily classroom activities for both the educator and the student. Through discussion, issues and concerns about technology in the classroom will also be examined. (1.5 credits)

EDU-332 — Teaching the Arts: Visual Arts, Drama, and Music (PJ)

This course will be divided into three modules: visual art, drama, and music. All three modules will address pedagogical content knowledge, practical applications of specialized concepts, and applications to the Ontario curriculum expectations and assessment practices. The visual arts emphasize an introductory understanding to the materials and instructional techniques of artistic processes while developing
visual expression, appreciation, and reflection. Drama will address the theoretical and practical teaching of dramatic forms while the Music module will encourage theoretical and practical applications of instructional techniques and musical concepts. Topics relevant for the P/J division include instructional method and strategies, authentic assessment practices, artistic growth and creatively, lesson planning,
resource development, Christian perspective, and personal artistic growth.

EDU-333 — Teaching the Arts: Visual Art, Drama, and Music (JI)

This course will be divided into three modules: visual art, drama, and music. All three modules will address pedagogical content knowledge, practical applications of specialized concepts, and applications to the Ontario curriculum expectations and assessment practices. The visual arts emphasize an introductory understanding to the materials and instructional techniques of artistic processes while developing
visual expression, appreciation, and reflection. Drama will address the theoretical and practical teaching of dramatic forms while the Music module will encourage theoretical and practical applications of instructional techniques and musical concepts. Topics relevant for the J/I division include instructional method and strategies, authentic assessment practices, artistic growth and creatively, lesson planning, resource development, Christian perspective, and personal artistic growth.

EDU-334 — Play-based Learning and Teaching in the JK-SK Program (PJ)

This course will support teaching and learning in the full day Kindergarten Program in Ontario schools. In this course students will grow in their understanding of play based learning and learn how to organize learning around the Four Frames of the Kindergarten Program: belonging and contributing, self-regulation and well-being, demonstrating literacy and mathematics behaviours, and problem-solving and innovating. Students wishing to be in a kindergarten practicum must take this course. (1.5 credits)

EDU-335 — Early Elementary Reading Practices (PJ)

This course presents a cognitive framework for understanding reading development and for diagnosing and remediating the reading difficulties encountered by some students. After review of reading theory and current methods of teaching reading, there is an examination of some informal methods of assessing students’ reading difficulties and ways of remediating these problems. This course includes working
with an at-risk reader. It is strongly recommended that students interested in Special Education or working with struggling readers at the JK-Grade 3 level take this course.

EDU-337 — Teaching Social Studies (PJ)

An examination of curriculum design, topics, methods, resources, and practical application for teaching social studies in the primary and junior grades with special reference to the Ontario curriculum. (1.5 credits)

EDU-338 — Teaching Social Studies: History and Geography (JI)

An examination of curriculum design, topics, methods, resources, and practical application for teaching social studies in the junior grades and history and geography in the intermediate grades with special reference to the Ontario curriculum. (1.5 credits)

EDU-340 — Teaching Health, Dance, and Physical Education (PJ)

This course provides introductory skills and information necessary to planning and teaching an effective health and physical education program in the primary and junior divisions.

EDU-341 — Teaching Health, Dance, and Physical Education (JI)

This course provides introductory skills and information necessary to planning and teaching an effective health and physical education program in the junior and intermediate divisions.

EDU-404 — Project Based Learning

This course provides an overview of project-based learning as a pedagogical choice, a framework to construct projects, and it will use practices (protocols, technology, assessment) for implementation and execution of effective projects. The focus will be on the creation and presentation of a project that can be used in the context of the Ontario curriculum. (1.5 credits)

EDU-407 — Systems of Education in Ontario

This course explores the foundations of educational institutions in Canada and especially the province of Ontario. The origin and development of public, separate, and private schools will be studied. The main requirements of the Ontario Education Act, key Regulations, and the Foundations of Professional Practice will be reviewed to prepare education students to understand the legal and professional context for teaching in Ontario.

EDU-414 — Curriculum Foundations

This course is a survey of the orientations, themes, and concepts of curriculum theory and practice. The focus will be on program choices and instructional decisions that must be made in the context of a comprehensive vision for schooling in relation to the Ontario curriculum.

EDU-415 — Teaching Practice: Classroom Management

This course identifies and explores theories and practices of classroom management in light of recent educational research, professional standards for teaching in Ontario, and the mission of the teacher education program of Redeemer University with an emphasis on effective teaching and service to students in Ontario schools. The course challenges students to identify their vision for classroom management, as well as to develop a plan for specific strategies for enacting their vision. (1.5 credits)

EDU-417 — Inclusive Teaching Practice: Special Education and English Language Learning

This course covers theories and practices of special education and English language learning in light of recent educational research, professional standards for teaching in Ontario, and the mission of the teacher education program of Redeemer University with an emphasis on effective teaching and service to students in Ontario schools. An introduction to the theories, practices, and issues related to educating the exceptional student in our schools is provided. This course is designed to encourage that the needs
of all students be met within an inclusive learning environment. The focus will be to equip teachers with an ability to better understand the learning needs of all students and teaching strategies that will help meet these needs. (1.5 credits)

EDU-421 — Engaging Literacy in the Primary Grades (PJ)

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of emergent literacy in the classroom. Teacher candidates will be enabled to articulate the meaning and implications for a Christian who is teaching within a variety of school systems. This course will focus on the emergent and early learner while exploring aspects of personal classroom practices, required skill sets, child-led and centre-based learning, and theoretical practices underlying current literacy teaching. Prospective teachers will be introduced to Ministry of Education documents and provincial expectations for literacy learning. Aspects of theory as leading to meaningful practice will be explored. Learning opportunities are provided through interactive dialogic discussion, assigned readings and critique, modeled reading/writing activities, teaching practice activities, and imaginative literacy opportunities to integrate literacy for K learners into all elements of the classroom. This course will enable new teachers to make informed choices in developing effective, creative language arts practices for emerging and early literacy learners. (1.5 credits)

EDU-422 — Engaging Literacy in the Junior Grades (PJ)

In building upon the learning in EDU-421, the course will continue to explore the research and theory that act as foundational thinking for teaching language arts in the junior classroom. The goal of this course is to assist the P/J teacher candidate to scaffold learners from emergent into developing literacy skills. Learning opportunities include practice teaching activities, interactive dialogic readings and critique, introduction to newer literacy interventions, and planning for language arts in order to meet provincial requirements for formal schooling. This course will equip teachers to be able to design and implement a successful P/J literacy program. (1.5 credits)

EDU-423 — Engaging Literacy in the Junior Grades (JI)

For teacher candidates in the J/I stream, this course provides an introduction to the theory, research and practice essential for developing student learning in literacy. This course provides instruction for teaching grades 4-6 which will then serve to scaffold further teaching of students (especially those who may struggle) in grades 7-10. Teacher candidates will be enabled to articulate the meaning and implications for a Christian who is teaching within a variety of school systems. Prospective teachers will be introduced to provincial Ministry of Education documents and expectations for learning. Aspects of theory and practice underlying current literary acquisition will be explored. Learning opportunities are provided through interactive dialogic discussion, assigned readings and critique, teaching practice activities, and imaginative literacy opportunities. This course will enable new teachers to make informed choices in developing effective, creative language arts practices for junior literacy learners. (1.5 credits)

EDU-424 — Engaging Literacy in the Intermediate Grades (JI)

In building upon the learning of EDU-423, the course will continue to explore the essentials needed for meaningful literacy practices in the adolescent classroom. The goal of this course is to enable the intermediate teacher candidate to equip learners into intermediate literacy skills (7-10). Learning opportunities include practice teaching activities, introduction to a variety of literacy genres, interactive dialogic readings and critique, introduction to 2.0 literacies, media and literature circles, and planning for language arts that meet the provincial requirements for formal schooling. This course will equip teachers to be able to design and implement a successful intermediate program across a range of diverse and differentiated learning orientations. (1.5 credits)

EDU-432 — Differentiated Instruction (PJI)

This course is designed to encourage in-service teachers to develop confidence in their abilities to better meet the needs of all students within an inclusive learning environment through differentiated instruction. The focus will be to equip teachers with an ability to better understand the learning needs of their students and teaching strategies that will help meet these needs. Class sessions will consist of group work, discussion, presentations, lectures, and readings (1.5 credits).

EDU-437 — Teaching Geography (JI)

This course provides teacher candidates who have identified geography as their intermediate division teaching subject with a sustained focus on geography curriculum and pedagogy. Building on the foundation established in EDU-338, this course will provide depth and breadth for the effective teaching of geography in the intermediate grades. (1.5 credits)

EDU-438 — Teaching History (JI)

This course provides teacher candidates who have identified history as their intermediate division teaching subject with a sustained focus on history curriculum and pedagogy. Building on the foundation established in EDU-338, this course will provide depth and breadth for the effective teaching of history in the intermediate grades. (1.5 credits)

EDU-440 — Teaching Mathematics in the Primary Grades (PJ)

The underlying purpose of the course is to develop candidates’ awareness and understanding of theories, research, and methodologies that can be applied to the teaching of mathematics in the primary grades (1-3). While the course focuses on the content and expectations of the Ontario curriculum, its overall purpose is to expose teacher candidates to important topics in math education that are of concern to math teachers nationally and internationally such as: nature of math; mathematical literacy; teaching mathematics to all students; constructivist approaches; developmental aspects; and the use of technology in teaching math. The course will also nurture an appreciation for the order revealed by mathematical
relationships within the structures of creation and imbue candidates with a sense of intrigue and excitement about teaching and learning mathematics.

EDU-441 — Teaching Mathematics in the Junior Grades (PJ)

This course follows the general framework described in EDU-440, except that the focus has shifted to the junior grades, 4-6. (1.5 credits)

EDU-442 — Teaching Mathematics in the Junior Grades (JI)

The underlying purpose of the course is to develop teacher candidates’ awareness and understanding of theories, research, and methodologies that can be applied to the teaching of mathematics in the junior grades (4-6). While the course focuses on the content and expectations of the Ontario curriculum, its overall purpose is to expose teacher candidates to important topics in math education that are of concern
to math teachers nationally and internationally such as: nature of math; mathematical literacy; teaching mathematics to all students; constructivist approaches; developmental aspects; and the use of technology in teaching math. The course will also nurture an appreciation for the order revealed by mathematical relationships within the structures of creation and imbue candidates with a sense of intrigue and excitement about teaching and learning mathematics.

EDU-443 — Teaching Mathematics in the Intermediate Grades (JI)

This course follows the general framework described in EDU-442, except that the focus has shifted to the intermediate grades, 7-10. (1.5 credits)

EDU-446 — Teaching Science (PJ)

This course introduces teacher candidates to theories, research, and methodologies for teaching science and technology in the primary and junior grades. While the course focuses on the content and expectations of the Ontario curriculum, its overall purpose is to expose teacher candidates to current topics in science education that are of concern to science teachers nationally and internationally such as: scientific literacy,
science for all, scientific inquiry, the nature of science, and teaching science beyond its traditional content. The course will provide teacher candidates with opportunities for planning units, lessons and activities for teaching basic science concepts for a diversity of Grade 1-6 students. (1.5 credits)

EDU-447 — Teaching Science (JI)

This course introduces teacher candidates to theories, research, and methodologies for teaching science and technology in the junior and intermediate grades. While the course focuses on the content and expectations of the Ontario curriculum, its overall purpose is to expose teacher candidates to current topics in science education that are of concern to science teachers nationally and internationally such as: scientific literacy, science for all, scientific inquiry, the nature of science, and teaching science beyond its traditional content. The course will provide teacher candidates with opportunities for planning units, lessons and activities for teaching basic science concepts for a diversity of Grade 4-10 students. (1.5 credits)

EDU-449 — Teaching Science (JI)

This course provides teacher candidates who have identified science as their intermediate division teaching subject with a sustained focus on science curriculum and pedagogy. Building on the foundation established in EDU-447, this course will provide depth and breadth for the effective teaching of science in the intermediate grades. (1.5 credits)

EDU-478 — Practicum I, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-479 — Practicum I, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-488 — Professional Teaching Seminar and Reflective Practice

Before, during, and after the two six-week sessions of practicum teaching in the final year, this seminar will be required for discussion and reflection on the practicum teaching experience. This course will consist of approximately five days of seminar time, scheduled before, during, and after the teaching practicums. It will include written assignments, communal reflection and self-assessment on the practicum experience,
and a variety of guest speakers from the profession. (1.5 credits)

EDU-490 — Practicum II, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-491 — Practicum II, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-492 — Practicum III, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-493 — Practicum III, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-494 — Practicum IV, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-495 — Practicum IV, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-496 — Field Experience I, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-497 — Field Experience I, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-498 — Field Experience II, Primary/Junior

Practical classroom experience.

EDU-499 — Field Experience II, Junior/Intermediate

Practical classroom experience.

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