Courses
Explore the exciting array of courses offered as part of your degree at Redeemer.
This course will provide students with an immersion into the world of molecular biology research. Students will investigate unique research questions within a teambased laboratory setting. Throughout the course, students will gain experience with project and experimental design, various laboratory techniques, data analysis and interpretation, as well as the honing of oral and written communication skills. This course is particularly intended for students interested in graduate studies, or careers in the research field. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Prerequisites:
Genetics
BIO‑261
Discussion of the organization, replication, transmission, expression, and evolution of genetic materials. The course is organized around the levels of genes, chromosomes, organisms and populations. Topics include the expression, control and mutation of genes; the molecular organization and information coding; replication, repair, transmission and mutation of chromosomes; the relation between genes, genotype, phenotype and environment; and the genetic structure and variability of populations, including selection and speciation. Throughout the course methods of investigation will be explained. The structure and operation of genetics as a science will also receive attention. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Genetics (BIO‑261);
Biochemistry I: Structures and Functions of Biomolecules
BIO‑361
An introduction to the structure, function and analysis of the major classes of biomolecules found in living organisms: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Includes an introduction to the structure and function of enzymes. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Biochemistry I: Structures and Functions of Biomolecules (BIO‑361);
Microbiology
BIO‑351
An introductory course which provides an understanding of microbial structure and biochemistry and includes practical experience in the handling and maintenance of microbial cultures. Topics include the classification and identification of microorganisms, the role of micro-organisms in health and disease, and the application of microbial processes in industry. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Microbiology (BIO‑351)
Inquiry of Issues in Health
HSC‑342
This course will explore the cutting-edge research that informs on current issues in the health field. By examining primary biomedical literature, students will develop the skills necessary to perform effectively as a health researcher. This course is problem-based; it is skill-driven rather than content-driven and focuses on the development of skills that are widely sought in university graduates–the ability to research and analyze detailed problems and to communicate clearly and persuasively. This course will involve interdependent and independent small group learning. Collectively, the class will ask questions that will explore the topics from multiple perspectives, while also learning to assess the quality of the information being examined.
Inquiry of Issues in Health (HSC‑342)
Related programs: Biology
Aesthetics ART‑248
A philosophical consideration of art and art criticism, drawing on both classical and contemporary thinkers. Topics include beauty, expression, representation, aesthetic distance, the identity of the work of art, the relation of art to morality, and the influence of art on perception.
Related programs: Art
Aesthetics PHL‑248
A philosophical consideration of art and art criticism, drawing on both classical and contemporary thinkers. Topics include beauty, expression, representation, aesthetic distance, the identity of the work of art, the relation of art to morality, and the influence of art on perception.
Related programs: Philosophy
This course surveys American writing from its origins before the United States existed as a nation until the middle of the twentieth century (WWII). Emphasizing the interrelationship between the literature and its historical background, the course includes the study of important prose and poetry from the colonial, revolutionary, Romantic, and Modern periods. Attention is given to this literature’s diverse cultural strands, the contested space of exploration and colonization (including Puritanism), Enlightenment rationalism and individual liberty, transcendentalism, slavery and civil war, race relations, realism, naturalism, Imagism, and Modernism.
Prerequisites: ENG-103 or 104
Related programs: English Writing; English Literature
A survey of standards, classic and contemporary books for children, with special consideration of literature’s capacity to delight, to instruct and shape the values and convictions of young readers.
Related programs: Education
This course introduces students to Reformational philosophy through a historical examination of modern and contemporary Reformed philosophers and the major philosophical issues they encounter. Key philosophers to be examined include Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and H. Evan Runner, as well as some Reformed Epistemologists such as Nicholas Wolterstorff.
Related programs: Philosophy
An introduction to analytical chemistry. Topics include statistics, proper handling of lab equipment, calibration of analytical instrumentation, equilibrium chemistry, gravimetric and titrimetric methods, UV/visible spectrophotometry, atomic emission and absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, and high- performance liquid chromatography. Includes a weekly three-hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Prerequisites:
Principles of Chemistry II
CHE‑122
A continuation of CHE-121. Topics include reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, strong and weak acids and bases, solubility products, electrochemistry, the direction of chemical change, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Includes a weekly three hour lab. Materials fee applies.
Principles of Chemistry II (CHE‑122)
Related programs: Biochemistry; Chemistry
Developing more or less parallel to the history course on Asian philosophy, Ancient Philosophy traces the beginnings of Western philosophy, focusing largely on ancient Greece and Rome. Particular emphasis will be on reading the entirety of what are sometimes known as “The Twin Pillars of Oxford University”–Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Ethics–though attention will also be given to major works in the Epicurean and Stoic traditions.
Related programs: History
Developing more or less parallel to the history course on Asian philosophy, Ancient Philosophy traces the beginnings of Western philosophy, focusing largely on ancient Greece and Rome. Particular emphasis will be on reading the entirety of what are sometimes known as “The Twin Pillars of Oxford University”–Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Ethics–though attention will also be given to major works in the Epicurean and Stoic traditions.
Related programs: Philosophy
The internship course is designed to allow senior students the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge of the discipline in an occupational setting. Internships are completed in community based or governmental organizations and students are required to observe and participate in a job-related capacity under supervision. Admission to the internship requires instructor approval. The internship course is comprised of a placement (field work) and in-class component. See page 61 for information on internships.
Prerequisites: Year 3 or 4 standing
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